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Thread: Please Stand United With Us......

  1. #16

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    maybe if you guys have the facts you may change you opinion.....
    David C Bastian Jr.
    Commercial Sales Manager
    Towne Auto Group

  2. #17

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    Subject: Compuware Chief takes on Detroit Three Senate CriticBY PETER KARMANOS, JR.
    U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Alabama, has emerged as the leading Senate critic of the proposed aid package for the Detroit auto industry. It’s pretty clear Shelby has nothing but disdain for Ford, GM, Chrysler and the United Auto Workers, not surprising considering he comes from a state with assembly plants for Mercedes-Benz, Honda and Hyundai. Shelby is in a key position on the Detroit rescue as senior Republican on the Senate Banking Committee.
    Wednesday, he continued his anti-Detroit rhetoric, saying he didn’t think the U.S.-based industry was going to turn around without a bankruptcy and the ouster of its leadership.
    “I don’t think they have immediate plans to change their model, which is a model of failure,” Shelby said, dismissing the $25 billion in bridge loan being requested as “life support” for Detroit.
    “I believe their best option would be some type of Chapter 11 bankruptcy,” Shelby said. “These leaders have been failures and they need to go.”
    Shelby actually ratcheted up his anti-Detroit campaign on the Sunday morning talk show circuit, which drew an interesting response from Motor City defender Peter Karmanos, chairman and CEO of Compuware Corp., which moved its headquarters into a new downtown building just a few years ago.
    Here’s part of what Karmanos said in a letter to Shelby:
    I watched with great interest Meet the Press, during which you and Sen. Carl Levin debated the merits of (or, concerning your position, the folly) providing financial aid to America’s domestic auto industry.
    I must admit that I was more than a little taken aback by how out of touch you really are about what Detroit’s Big Three automakers have been doing for some time and continue to do to transform their businesses to both survive in today’s debilitating economic climate and thrive in the future. The steps have been extremely significant and take it from mesomeone who lives and works in the Motor Cityincredibly painful as well.
    I can only trust that you will take some time and conduct the proper due diligence before continuing to espouse your inaccuracies. At minimum, I believe the domestic auto industry (and its millions of hardworking, taxpaying employees), which helped make America great, deserve as much.
    Don’t you?
    The intent of this letter, however, is not to take you to task for the inaccuracy of your comments or for the over-simplicity of your views, but rather to point out the hypocrisy of your position as it relates to Alabama’s (the state for which you have served as senator since 1987) recent history of providing subsidies to manufacturing. During the segment on Meet the Press, you stated that:
    “We don’t need government governmental subsidies for manufacturing in this country. It’s the French model, it’s the wrong road. We will pay for it. The average American taxpayer is going to pay dearly for this, if I’m not wrong.”
    I trust it is safe to say that when you refer to “government subsidies,” you are referring to subsidies provided by both federal and state governments. And if this is in fact true, then I am sure you were adamantly against the State of Alabama offering lucrative incentives (in essence, subsidies) to Mercedes Benz in the early 1990s to lure the German automobile manufacturer to the State.
    As it turned out, Alabama offered a stunning $253 million incentive package to Mercedes. Additionally, the State also offered to train the workers, clear and improve the site, upgrade utilities, and buy 2,500 Mercedes Benz vehicles. All told, it is estimated that the incentive package totaled anywhere from $153,000 to $220,000 per created job. On top of all this, the State gave the foreign automaker a large parcel of land worth between $250 and $300 million, which was coincidentally how much the company expected to invest in building the plant.
    With all due respect, Senator, where was your outrage when all this was going on? I certainly don’t recall you going in front of the nation (as you did this past Sunday) to discuss what a big mistake Alabama was making in providing subsidies to Mercedes Benz. If you had, however, you could have talked about how, applying free market principles, Alabama shouldn’t have had to resort to subsidies to land Mercedes Benz. Competitively speaking, if Alabama had been the strongest candidate under consideration (i.e. highest quality infrastructure, workforce, research and development facilities, business climate, etc.), then subsidies shouldn’t have been required.

    The fact is that Alabama knew that, on a level playing field, it could not compete with the other states under consideration and, thus, to lure the German car builder to the State, it offered the aforementioned unprecedented subsidies. In effect, Alabama
    your state did exactly what you said government should not do: provide subsidies for manufacturing.

    It’s no great mystery why Alabama politicians went to such dramatic anti-free-market measures to secure Mercedes Benz
    they did it for the betterment of their state through job creation and increased tax revenues. And who could blame them? Is that so different than what would occur by providing financial aid to help rescue the domestic auto industry? Such aid would save millions of jobs and millions of dollars in lost tax revenue.

    Additionally, unlike the giveaways Alabama bestowed upon the foreign automaker in question, United States tax payers would be reimbursed with interest (as they were when Chrysler received government aid in the early 1980s) for their investment in what is clearly a critically important industry for America’s present and future.

    Peter Karmanos, Jr., is Chairman and CEO Compuware Corporation.
    David C Bastian Jr.
    Commercial Sales Manager
    Towne Auto Group

  3. #18
    Super Moderator gunny's Avatar
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    Default Detroit Will Just Have To Suck It Up

    No different than the hurt locker put on the Construction Industry. Plenty of builders, tradesmen & suppliers feeling the pain. Do our tax dollars bail them out next?
    Last edited by gunny; November 21st, 2008 at 02:57 PM.
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  4. #19
    Senior Member Cedar Mill Limousine's Avatar
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    The dems will bail them out-the unions won't let them do otherwise. It is weird how so much was effected by home construction. All everyone talked about was how the bubble was going to burst-yet everyone kept investing into it. Hindsight is 20/20-greed is a monster.

    I think Jim mentioned Bill Gates-I heard on the radio yesterday that Microsoft (or Bill Gates?) has $24 million in cash...will the big 3 have apples on their hoods now??
    Rich Rottier
    219.808.0976 | richrottier@gmail.com

  5. #20
    Super Moderator Limo Scene's Avatar
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    Did you notice how much those guys that are pleading for money gave away after 9/11. If I gave away all my money I too would need a bailout. Maybe the reason why those that gave none are not struggling to survive.

    I rest my case on bad management. They gave away the farm and now they want it back. Don't think for a minute that I don't appreciate their efforts in America's time of need but look where it put them.

    They made the decision to give it away. I would love to buy a house for every family at our local homeless shelter but I can't because I would go broke just like they did. It is so elementary.

    Have a good weekend all!
    Jim A. Luff
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  6. #21
    Senior Member Limo Padawan InTheLeftLane's Avatar
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    Default How best to build a strong industry and a strong country...

    Many of you know I am active and very engaged in the entrepreneurial community in Arizona (we just held the 3rd Annual Entrepreneurship Conference - very successful) and I am undecided on how the American taxpayer needs to respond to this 'crisis'.

    While I do not wish undue hardship on anyone, I am not sure that the free market system that makes us a great country does not warrant a re-org / bankruptcy or failure of this magnitude to correct the inane, lackadaisical and bloated excesses that proceeded it.

    Just really struggling with this issue and the one that had us all worked up a few weeks ago about the mortgage industry and now the plan Congress approved is being chucked out the door for some other idea, but using the same federal cash cow.

    Is our current leadership so out of touch with reality that they beleive we will gloss over these issues?! No wonder the election swept the incumbents out of office so handily. This lame duck congress is trying to give away the farm before they get booted out the door!
    Steven Groves
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  7. #22
    Super Moderator gunny's Avatar
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    Congress should kick out to every US Taxpayer a $20k voucher good towards the purchase of a Big 3 Auto instead of throwing $25B into companies who will not be able to move inventory for the next year or two (meaning more $$$ from Big Bro or they're going tits up anyways).
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  8. #23
    Super Moderator Limo Scene's Avatar
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    I like that idea Gunny. I think we should get the fat cats at the oil companies to sit down with the fat cats from the auto manufacturers, throw in some government hand out spending money to the citizens good for either gas or a vehicle purchase and just work some kind of deal out. The gas companies can make even more profit and then subsidize the car industry that sucks up all the fuel and it is a win-win!

    What I find ironic is that every single one the three chiefs of the auto makers took a private jet to go tell Congress how freakin' broke they are. Unbelievable. Yeah, I wish I could hop on a jet to go tell Congress what kind of help I need and then jet home in time for dinner with my family.
    Jim A. Luff
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  9. #24

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    Ford has Glimpse of a Road to Recovery

    Even if federal loans refused, automaker has edge over rivals.

    BY SARAH A. WEBSTER

    FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITER

    Last week's hearings on Capital Hill lumped Detroit's automakers together as desperate enterprises so troubled that they must submit business plans to Congress to prove they are worth saving with emergency loans.

    But ever so subtly, Ford Motor Co. is separating itself from its crosstown rivals, General Motors Corp. and Chrysler LLC.

    Still a troubled company that is hemorrhaging money -- nearly $24 billion during the past three years -- and losing market share, Ford is regarded as the healthiest of the three companies, as UAW President Ron Gettelfinger last week told Congress. The automaker also is making strides in fuel economy and the safety and quality ratings of its vehicles, and its new F-150 pickup -- a company profit leader -- is expected to do well after sales rebound from the toughest market in 25 years.

    Chief Executive Officer Alan Mulally told Senate and House committees he wasn't even sure that Ford, which had $19 billion in cash at the end of September, would need federal assistance.

    "I think we can make it through this recession, if it doesn't get worse," Mulally said. "We believe we have sufficient liquidity to make it through this slowdown."

    Mulally, who left Boeing Co. to become Ford's CEO in September 2006, said the automaker joined in the request for aid only because it might need the money if the economy worsens and because a collapse of GM or Chrysler could take down parts suppliers, which would ultimately seize up operations for Ford, too

    Sales down, but quality up Despite Ford's precarious position, as the company waits for the political and economic climate to shake out, automotive analysts and Ford dealers also told the Free Press there are signs that the company's condition could improve in the near term.

    While Ford's sales are down 18.6% through October compared to the same period a year ago, the company is making gains in key areas.

    For much of the year, the Ford Focus compact car, which averages 27 miles per gallon and comes with optional cutting-edge Sync telecommunications and
    entertainment technology, climbed the sales charts. So far this year, the vehicle built in Wayne is up 20.5%.

    Now Ford's perennial breadwinner, the F-150, has been revamped and is earning rave reviews, a promising sign that could help Ford pull ahead of its sluggish crosstown rivals. The F-150 is part of Ford's best-selling F-Series lineup, which still makes up about one-fourth of the company's sales and a disproportionate amount of the company's profits.

    Ford has made documented gains in safety, quality and fuel economy that it needs to have sink into the public consciousness, bolstered by publications such as Consumer Reports. Ford's Fusion midsize car was even selected for the cover of the magazine's best cars issue.

    "Everybody is aware that Ford's quality has gone up," said Terry Kidd, who owns Kidd Ford Lincoln Mercury outside of Nashville, Tenn.

    As Mulally sat in front of Congress, flanked by his needier counterparts at GM and Ford, he repeatedly tried to emphasize the unique position of Ford and the "clear vision" it has for the future.

    As the executives were collectively grilled and flogged for their companies' past failures, Mulally repeatedly emphasized: "We're in a little different position."

    Financially, Mulally told Congress that Ford does not intend to tap the federal loans if it doesn't have to. Shortly after Mulally became CEO, the company mortgaged its assets, from the F-150 brand to the blue oval logo, to ensure a line of credit for its turnaround. That has put it in a better liquidity position than GM and Chrysler.

    "If the economy starts to go down, we would have to access that money, too," Mulally told a House committee. "How much we would access would be dependent on how far the economy and the industry degrades."

    Passing on the federal loans might prevent the company's shareholders from having their stock further diluted if the company is forced to give the government stock warrants in exchange for the loans.

    Shares of Ford closed Friday at $1.43. Just four years ago, Ford shares traded in the mid-teens and paid dividends of 10 cents every quarter.

    The stockholders, of course, include the Ford family.

    While the family would still retain its 40% supervoting power through its Class B shares if stock warrants were issued, the family has already seen the value of its shares plummet.

    What's more, Ford stopped paying dividends in September 2006 -- when Mulally was hired and the company revised its Way Forward turnaround plan for the
    second time.

    If Ford could make it through this downturn without federal money, it could escape jumping through all the hoops that Congress is setting up as an obstacle course to receive loans.

    Faint praise from lawmakers

    While most members of Congress seemed content to lump Detroit in one basket and bash them together, a few lawmakers had almost-kind words for Ford.

    While criticizing Detroit's boardrooms for being "famously devoid of vision," Sen. Chris Dodd, the Connecticut Democrat who chairs the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs, added: "Clearly there have been exceptions. Ford was arguably ahead of the market when they saw a big future in the fuel-efficient and alternative energy vehicles."

    Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., who was particularly critical, also noted the distinction.

    "My sense is that Ford has done a better job and is in a slightly stronger position," he said. "GM has made some changes, but is spiraling downward, and I know it's a private company and results aren't available, but Chrysler barely has a heartbeat.

    "I wonder why we're talking to three companies. Seems to me that that premise to begin with is very flawed. Now obviously you all have been involved in a pact."

    David Cole, chairman of the Center for Automotive Research, said all of Detroit's auto companies are in the emergency room and need help, but Ford just isn't as badly injured.

    "They've tried to walk that fine line: We need it, but we don't need it that badly," Cole said.

    Revamped F-150 gets raves


    One of the biggest reasons to hold out hope for a strong Ford turnaround, dealers and automotive experts told the Free Press, is the launch of the 2009 F-150 pickup.

    "I know Washington doesn't want to hear about pickup trucks," said Erich Merkle, a senior automotive analyst with Crowe Horwath in Grand Rapids. But, he said, "Ford is very well positioned in that pickup truck segment when it ultimately starts to rebound."

    Already, dealers across the country told the Free Press that F-150 sales are off to a better start than expected.

    "It's doing fantastic," said Jason Pittack, co-owner of Woodhouse Ford in Blair, Neb. His dealership is No. 1 in Ford pickup sales, with more than 2,500 sales annually.

    "Farmers are having their best year in many years," he explained. "The people that need trucks, they're coming in and zapping them up."

    For that reason, Pittack is one of several dealers who think Ford is going to do just fine.

    "Regardless of what the press is saying, I think Ford is in a good position," he said.

    Kidd said he's so confident in Ford that he's been gobbling up a lot of Ford stock, as well as that of key parts supplier Visteon.

    "I feel great," Kidd said of Ford, noting that his truck sales have been strong since gas prices started dropping again. "I truly believe in it. I'm not looking for it to turn tomorrow, but in the long run. I think Ford is making tremendous strides."

    Contact SARAH A. WEBSTER at 313-222-5394 or
    swebster@freepress.com.
    David C Bastian Jr.
    Commercial Sales Manager
    Towne Auto Group

  10. #25
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    A word to the wise. Major limo companies are experiencing painful layoffs in the past week and a half. Information comes first hand. Advice to small operators: Do your homework to attract new customers. The s... is hitting the fan. What ever it takes to keep your cars rolling, do it. Promotions and discounts are the order of the day. This economy will separate the men from the boys. The strong and creative will survive. This is not the time to stand by idly while your sales drop to the basement.

  11. #26
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    When someone can show me a sedan other than a TC that will accommodate 2 large pullmans, 2 carryons, and 1 or 2 hard case golf bags plus 2 clients, I'm ready to switch loyalties. Or how about an SUV that will accommodate 6 average (180 pound) clients and luggage? Which foreign manufacturer were you going to suggest?

    Personally, I'd like to see a TDI, diesel powered sedan and SUV, don't understand why Detroit can't make a diesel to get more than 20 mpg. Diesel is much more efficient and safer in my mind than an electric hybrid. Think major crash, what happens to the batteries if broken? Hazmat, fire issue? No Thanks!

  12. #27
    Super Moderator gunny's Avatar
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    Default You Might Be A Redneck If........

    Reporting from West Point, Ga. -- This attractive old mill town along the Chattahoochee River, with its brick downtown and streets of cozy, unpretentious homes, could be the backdrop for a patriotic American car commercial -- lacking only the plaintive croak of a Bob Seger or John Mellencamp.

    But America's Big Three automakers, which are teetering at a financial abyss, shouldn't expect much sympathy here.Kia Motors, the South Korean automaker, is building a plant in town, promising 2,500 jobs to help replace a textile industry that has all but vanished. The locals are excited to have nonunion work that will start at about $14 per hour. They are discovering the joys of authentic bulgogi -- a different kind of barbecue -- at the Korean restaurants popping up.

    And many of them are wondering why Detroit still thinks it's so special that it can ask taxpayers for a $25-billion bailout.

    "The foreign cars took the lead, and they deserve it," said Emile Earles, owner of Sweet Georgia Brown, a gift shop on a quiet downtown thoroughfare.

    Earles, 60, said she is fed up with Detroit -- fed up with its fat labor contracts, its arrogant CEOs, and even her Cadillac, which gets only 15 miles per gallon and cost her dearly when gas spiked to $4. Buying American, she added, "is still a big deal. But you can only be patriotic until you can't afford it anymore."

    Such sentiments represent more than a marketing problem for the CEOs of General Motors, Ford and Chrysler, who will return to Congress next week to argue that a federal cash infusion will help them avoid bankruptcy.

    A number of the bailout opponents are lawmakers representing Southern states that have lured foreign auto plants in recent years with generous tax incentives and right-to-work laws that guarantee abundant cheap labor.

    Like many residents of West Point, these lawmakers are wary of helping the domestic auto companies. Rep. Lynn Westmoreland (R-Ga.), whose district includes West Point, said the bailout would actually harm the companies by shielding them from the vigorous competition presented by auto plants in the South.

    "Competition makes people do a better job," he said.

    Westmoreland argues that fairness is another issue. Why, he wonders, should his constituents subsidize auto workers who, thanks to generous union contracts, often earn higher wages and better benefits than nonunion workers in the South? And didn't those contracts help get the Big Three into this mess?

    "The benefits a lot of these union members are offered is much better than what the average guy gets out there, whether he's working in an auto plant or not," he said.

    Ron Gettelfinger, president of the United Auto Workers, has argued that union contracts are not greedy, as some critics allege. This month, he said that lavish state incentives to foreign auto companies are one reason why domestic automakers deserve federal help.

    Kia certainly found plenty of incentives in west Georgia. When the company announced plans for its auto plant in early 2006, it came after intense courting from state and local officials, who offered the company tax breaks and other incentives totaling more than $400 million.

    In West Point, disdain for Detroit commingles with gratitude for Kia, which plans to begin production of its light SUV, the Sorento, next November.

    The new jobs will counter the devastating collapse of the textile industry in this border region of Alabama and Georgia known as the Chattahoochee Valley.

    The industry declined in the last two decades amid the turmoil of buyouts and the lure of cheap labor overseas. In Troup County, which encompasses part of West Point, employment stands at 8.9%. On the Alabama side, in Chambers County, unemployment is 14.3% -- the highest in the state.

    It's little surprise then that Kia has received more than 43,000 applications for the 2,500 openings. Another 2,500 jobs will be created by five new suppliers that will make parts for the main plant.

    As a result, West Point can seem like the rarest of American places these days -- a city daring to hope and planning for growth. Driving around town -- in his new Sorento -- Mayor Drew Ferguson IV talks of plans for riverfront development, a new high school, a new kayak launch on the river. Downtown, a sushi restaurant announces itself with a Grand Opening sign; a new Irish pub is coming soon.

    Todd Costley, 45, owner of a house-painting company, has added the name of his business in Korean script on the side of his Ford Ranger pickup. He hasn't had any Korean business yet, but with the number of foreign workers who have arrived in town, he figures it's inevitable.Costley is of the old school: He likes his car or motorcycle to carry an American brand. He supports bailing out Detroit, but reluctantly, fearing the broader economic calamity that may come if the carmakers fail.

    But as part of the deal, he said, domestic auto companies must learn from their mistakes."I think our government needs to have somebody analyze these foreign carmakers," he said. "Maybe we can copy ourselves off of them."

    Some of the opposition to the bailout stems from the long-standing opinion that Detroit no longer builds durable cars.

    On Monday afternoon at the Korean BBQ House -- a year-old restaurant in a former Pizza Hut -- a pair of Georgia natives in work shirts sat among Korean businessmen and homemakers, sampling braised short ribs. Both worked for a company that was helping build the auto plant; they said they couldn't give their names for fear of losing their jobs.

    The larger of the two men, a 57-year-old in a camouflage ball cap, growled angrily over what he called Detroit's incompetence.

    "I drive an '86 Nissan -- it's got 160,000 miles, and I can drive it to California today," he said. "Now you show me an American car that can do that."

    Across the street, more traditional Southern fare was offered at Roger's Pit-Cooked Bar-B-Que. Here, too, there was little enthusiasm for a bailout.

    Owner Debbie Williams, 50, blamed the Big Three for failing to change with the times and build smaller cars. She said she was thinking about getting rid of her Ford Explorer. "My next car is going to be a Kia, 'cause I appreciate them coming," she said.

    Leon Newton, 74, a retired pastor, said the domestic companies should be left to fend for themselves. Besides, he said, globalization has muddied the old rallying cry of "buy American."

    "I have no problem with the foreign car companies because they employ people here in America," he said. "We're making 'em here."

    Across town at Langley Motor Co. Inc., the local GM dealership, salesman Eddie W. Striblin sat in an empty showroom that seemed trapped in another era. The only car on the floor was a black-and-gold 1977 Trans Am in mint condition. The Marshall Tucker Band played on the radio.

    Striblin predicted that, despite all their troubles, the Big Three would survive somehow. Other companies may have a better business model, he argued, but no one delivers the romance of the road like the Americans.

    "Let me ask you a question," he said leaning over a clean desk. "You ever heard of anybody braggin' on a '57 Honda?"
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  13. #28

    Default Red White & Blue

    NLA Endorses Support of Combined General Motors/Ford/Chrysler Approach for Manufacturers’ Economic Recovery
    November 26, 2008
    The National Limousine Association endorses member support of the combined Chrysler/Ford/General Motors approach for the manufacturers’ economic recovery and recommends that all U.S. members register the same sentiment with their own Congressional leaders now.

    You can do this very easily and very quickly by reading the following letter, which recently was disseminated by General Motors Corporation, clicking on the link in the third to last paragraph and then following the instructions on the landing page to submit your viewpoint.

    1-2-3 and your voice will be heard! We encourage you to do this today!

    Letter from General Motors Corporation: Auto Industry Crisis

    November 19, 2008

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – As an important partner of General Motors, you are probably well aware that the auto industry is at a crossroads. Companies that support millions of workers and families across the U.S. have been slammed by the worst economic downturn in 75 years. Particularly frustrating is that this crisis struck just at a time when these companies were successfully restructuring themselves and creating a new generation of cleaner, more efficient vehicles.
    This progress, and the very existence of the U.S.-based auto industry, is threatened.
    Discussions are now underway in Washington D.C. about government support for this vital industry through this downturn. We are asking for your support, too.
    The U.S auto industry has been hit at every level by the global financial crisis. Carmakers can't get loans to complete their restructuring and put advanced technology vehicles into production. Customers can't get credit for new cars, and consumer confidence has plunged to an all-time low. Suppliers and dealers can't get loans for routine business needs.
    This crisis caught the U.S. auto industry in the midst of a successful restructuring. Domestic carmakers have closed the productivity gap with their global competitors, and GM has closed the quality gap as well. New labor agreements are in place to make U.S. manufacturers' costs competitive with non-union transplant factories.
    Since 2005, GM has taken a series of bold steps to restructure its business and reduce its structural cost. In fact, since 2005, GM has reduced structural cost in North America by over $9 billion. And more recently, GM has outlined plans to enhance its liquidity position by $20 billion through 2009. And, we've tightened our belt in hundreds of other ways, large and small - some of which you have felt too.
    On the product front, we have introduced a series of award-winning products, including the Saturn Aura, Cadillac CTS, Chevy Malibu and Buick Enclave. Today, we have the most models that get an EPA-estimated 30 mpg or better on the highway, more vehicles capable of running on E85 ethanol than any other automaker and a wide variety of hybrids, one for every need. We are also testing the world's largest fleet of hydrogen-powered cars right now and are committed to building the Chevy Volt extended-range electric car in 2010.
    However, faced with the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression and the worst car sales since World War II, this hasn't been enough.
    This current crisis knows no geographic boundaries. What happens to the U.S. auto industry also had an immediate impact on Main Street. U.S.-based carmakers have 105 plants in 20 states, including California, Texas, Kansas, Louisiana and Maryland. They support 14,000 dealers across the country, and these dealers in turn employ 740,000 people, with a total payroll of $35 billion a year. The companies buy $156 billion in parts and services from suppliers in every state. The auto companies provide pensions for 775,000 and health care benefit for 2 million.
    Because carmakers are so tightly woven into the fabric of the U.S. economy, the collapse of this industry would reach far beyond Detroit. The Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor predicts that a collapse of U.S.-based carmakers would lead to widespread failures of supplier companies, already pushed to the brink by the downturn, and this in turn would shut down the transplant factories owned by Toyota, Honda and other non-U.S. companies. Shockwaves through the economy would quickly put nearly 3 million people out of work. In the first year alone, personal income would drop by $150 billion, and tax and social security receipts would fall by more than $45 billion.
    Faced with these risks to the well-being of millions of Americans, and to the U.S. economy as a whole, it is clear to us that government support is a sound investment in an important industry, and in America itself.
    The Aura, CTS, Malibu and Enclave show that GM can compete with the best. Our aggressive restructuring and rapid global growth shows our commitment to reinventing our company. And the Chevy Volt and other advanced technology vehicles show our passion for being a leader in reinventing the automobile.
    Please share this information with all of your employees and other stakeholders. We hope you will ask your legislators and other political leaders to support the U.S. auto industry through this critical transformation. It's easy and turnkey. Please take a minute to go to http://gmfactsandfiction.com to show your support and let your voice be heard.
    To give you more context and the facts, attached are some industry talking points and the study recently released by industry analyst, David Cole, with the Center for Automotive Research (CAR), entitled: "The Impact of the U.S. Economy of a Major Contraction of the Detroit Three Automakers."
    Thank you for your time and support.
    Respectfully,
    Betsy Lazar, Executive Director, Advertising and Media Operations
    General Motors Corporation

    David C Bastian Jr.
    Commercial Sales Manager
    Towne Auto Group

  14. #29

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    McCotter Fights for Automotive Industry and Workers - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zI2nCkl19ZM&feature=related
    David C Bastian Jr.
    Commercial Sales Manager
    Towne Auto Group

  15. #30
    David C Bastian Jr.
    Commercial Sales Manager
    Towne Auto Group

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