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Thread: Hurricane Gustav

  1. #1
    Senior Member Wade Randolph's Avatar
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    Baton Rouge, LA USA
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    Default Hurricane Gustav

    Marc asked me to create this thread describing Gustav:

    When a named storm gets in the middle of the Gulf people flock to the stores for batteries, flashlights, generators, water and other non-perishable supplies. The next thing they do is fill up their cars and gas cans for generators. This creates several problems. The traffic is terrible, there are lines for food and the stores and then there are gas shortages. FEMA books all the local hotel rooms for first responders and then all your business gets cancelled. After Gustav hit the city was 100% without power for the first few days, almost every street was blocked with downed trees and power lines and no phone service. It took me three days to get back to my office and I stood in line for 3-hours at a local Grainger store for another generator for the office. We usually never lose power at work but with Gustav winds at 92 miles per hour here for several hours it wacked all the transmission lines. After I got the generator for the office I waited in a gas line for 4-hours to fill up two 5-gallon cans. I was able then to hook my generator up to our computer and phones. We were without power at home for 8-days and lived off my home generator with only a small window air conditioner and the refrigerator going. There were no restaurants opened for the first week and the few stations that had gas sold out quickly and had very long lines. I had bought 20 gallons for my home generator and that lasted us for the first 4-days at home. My home is by the Office of Emergency Preparedness and we could hear the helicopters overhead every few minutes. The whole area came to a literal standstill for the first week except for emergency workers and power crews. I was lucky no trees fell on my home but my neighbor had three fall through his brand new home. Things are just now getting back to normal here but there are blue tarps on most roofs and tree limbs stumps lying on the curbs waiting for the trash pickup vehicles. In the end we had no personal damage but my business suffered by losing almost 3-weeks of business. There are still some in this area without power. Thank god I had backed up everything the night before landfall and had redundant computer capabilities. I still consider myself lucky because other than financial we didnt suffer too much.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cedar Mill Limousine's Avatar
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    May 2008
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    Crown Point, Indiana (Northern Indiana)
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    Default

    Sorry to hear about your losses. Glad to hear you are o.k.
    Rich Rottier
    219.808.0976 | richrottier@gmail.com

  3. #3
    Senior Member ADAM's Avatar
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    Oct 2003
    Location
    Kalispell, Montana USA
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    Thank you for sharing Wade. Your experience, as well as Dean's and others' should be an eye opener for every operator on this Forum. Although we are not all subject to hurricanes, there are any number of natural disasters that can cause such business interruptions. Earthquakes, wildfires, tornadoes, floods and more put each of our operations at risk and we should be as prepared as possible to deal with those unpredictable interruptions without standing around with our hands out expecting someone else to come and fix it. Best of success to you as you and your community soldier forth. May we all adopt the Boy Scout motto of "Be Prepared!"
    Marc Rold
    Wild Horse Limousine
    www.wildhorselimo.com

  4. #4

    Default Western Louisiana

    The media ignores Louisiana when it comes to hurricanes and just focuses on New Orleans. Western Louisiana took a tremendous blow from Gustav. Wade Randolph is one of the best operators in the industry for over three decades and his word is Gold.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wade Randolph View Post
    Marc asked me to create this thread describing Gustav:

    When a named storm gets in the middle of the Gulf people flock to the stores for batteries, flashlights, generators, water and other non-perishable supplies. The next thing they do is fill up their cars and gas cans for generators. This creates several problems. The traffic is terrible, there are lines for food and the stores and then there are gas shortages. FEMA books all the local hotel rooms for first responders and then all your business gets cancelled. After Gustav hit the city was 100% without power for the first few days, almost every street was blocked with downed trees and power lines and no phone service. It took me three days to get back to my office and I stood in line for 3-hours at a local Grainger store for another generator for the office. We usually never lose power at work but with Gustav winds at 92 miles per hour here for several hours it wacked all the transmission lines. After I got the generator for the office I waited in a gas line for 4-hours to fill up two 5-gallon cans. I was able then to hook my generator up to our computer and phones. We were without power at home for 8-days and lived off my home generator with only a small window air conditioner and the refrigerator going. There were no restaurants opened for the first week and the few stations that had gas sold out quickly and had very long lines. I had bought 20 gallons for my home generator and that lasted us for the first 4-days at home. My home is by the Office of Emergency Preparedness and we could hear the helicopters overhead every few minutes. The whole area came to a literal standstill for the first week except for emergency workers and power crews. I was lucky no trees fell on my home but my neighbor had three fall through his brand new home. Things are just now getting back to normal here but there are blue tarps on most roofs and tree limbs stumps lying on the curbs waiting for the trash pickup vehicles. In the end we had no personal damage but my business suffered by losing almost 3-weeks of business. There are still some in this area without power. Thank god I had backed up everything the night before landfall and had redundant computer capabilities. I still consider myself lucky because other than financial we didnt suffer too much.
    Dean Schuler

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