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Thread: Rear Axle Noise in '93 DaBryan

  1. #1
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    I have a '93 85-inch TownCar with 270K that has a noise in back that won't die. I had the axles replaced, the shocks, anti-sway bar links, and everything thoroughly checked by three different repair shops. The Ford dealership that works on the car says that the Air-ride is fine, as are the carrier bearings, etc. One trouble spot is at the rear end of the floor panel, where the last drive shaft touches the floor pan in certain situations (grinding marks. DaBryan says the car was probably overloaded at some point and the floor pan came loose somewhat.I could not see any signs of that.
    Does anyone have any other suggestions? Could the dealership be misdiagnosing the air ride? The noise happens mainly when the weight is concentrated on the driver's side of the back.

  2. #2
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    If your floor is cracked, you will not see it. I would bet a few bucks that is exactly what you have. A dealership will never find it! I had this problem with two of my cars in the past, and the ONLY thing you can do if bring it to a limo manufacturer and let them fix it. I went through balancing drive shafts and everything at the dealer, and they still cound not find it. I bet it's worse with people in the car, and when first starting out, on hills, and at higher speeds! It happens a lot, and yes, it's from overloading. Word of warning, it will never be perfect again, it can just be better. Lincoln made weaker floor panels from mid 1990's to 1997. They changed the design when they changed the car in 1998, and my manufacturer says he hasn't seen it yet in the new cars. By the way, overloading means to actually put 10 people in a 10 passenger! It happens more with the 120" stretches, but my manufacturer says he's seen it in all sizes. Good luck. Do you love the car? Is ist making money? or dump it!

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the replies (by direct e-mail as well). The solution I found, however temporary, was to wedge two wooden blocks in between the cross beam holding the second carrier bearing and the floorboard. Those cross beams were very rusty, and our suspicion was that they were allowing for too much movement of the drive shaft. Even though I notice a little vibration when accelerating that wasn't there before, I had no more problems with that noise in the 30 drive-hours following the repair. I actually overloaded at some point for a short trip by having 8 + 2 in the car - no problem.
    So half an hour of diagnosing and two wooden blocks fixed a problem a dealership couldn't find in two inspections. So much for common-sense repair approaches.

  4. #4
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    Well on the bright side, how much did two wooden blocks cost? 50 cents or so and that sounds like a darn good repair job!

    :-)

    Thanks for the update.

  5. #5
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    One problem I have with your "common sense" fix is that it does not address the problem.
    You evidently have a situation where your car is deformed. Do you feel right subjecting yourself to possible legal action if the body IS torn? You don't have to have passengers falling out into the street to be sued. Just the fact you have fixed your vehicle with wood is endangering the public.
    A reputable autobody shop can fix any damage your limo has fairly cheaply. I wouldn't trust them to build a limo, but they are in the business of fixing auto bodies. I urge you to fix the problem not just 'paint' it over.

  6. #6
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    Your concerns are definitely worth concern -- lets hope safety has not been compromised with the above approach.

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