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Thread: How to: 95 - 97 Town Car Heater Core - Blend door Replacement

  1. #1
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    Ahh, what a fun job. It's not as hard as I thought it would be but still took me about 4.5 hours from start to finish. To make this job easier you may want to remove the passenger seat and the glove box.

    Tools needed:
    11 mm socket (dash bracket mounts)
    10 mm socket (under-dash nuts on heater box)
    5/16 socket/driver for heater hoses
    6 mm socket (for floor box)

    I am posting these pics because info on the internet is limited for TC heater core replacement, hopefully this helps someone else when they need to replace one.

    If you find the instructions on the internet they will tell you to remove three nuts under the wiper motor, these do NOT need to be removed. The only things under the hood that need to be removed are the two heater hoses and one nut just to the left (toward driver side) of the two heater hoses.

    Under the dash you will need to disconnect the group of vacuum hoses from the diaphrams shown in the pictures. This has a master disconnect and is easy to get to. Also you need to remove the floor heater box, it's just a small disapation box to direct heat under the carpet to the rear seating area. This requires removal of two small screws (6 mm ?) and one push-pin.

    There are two nuts on the bottom of the heater box right where the interior carpet stops under the dash, remove these.

    Remove the electronic box attached to the heater box by sliding it upward and pulling two connectors.

    Before removing the box you will need to remove some screws in order to pull the dash back as far as possible on the right side. Remove the lower-right dash nut that holds the dash to the door jamb piller. Then (behind the glove box) there are two 11 mm screws holding a dash brace that need to be removed. The dash does not need to be removed from the car, just pulled back enough to let the heater box come out the bottom.

    Once these things are disconnected you can pull the box straight back to clear the heater tubes through the firewall and clear the top stud. Before pulling the box all the way out you will need to reach up on top of the box and disconnect the wiring from the blend door (shown in pics).

    Now the fun part, getting the box out from under the dash. This will take a lot of playing, twisting and pulling but trust me, it WILL come out.

    Re-assemble in the reverse order.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    This is what has to be removed from the dash in order to replace the core.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
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    The "Blend door Actuator" is located on the top of the heater box. The entire box will need to be removed for replacement.

    NOTE: This may be able to be replaced by just dropping the heater box but if you are in this this far to replace the blend door, spend the 28 bucks and replace the heater core while you are here.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
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    I have replaced over 10 of these. I found out that you can replace the core without removing the whole plenum box. If the electronic actuator device needs to be replaced, I am unsure if the box needs to be removed. I was able to remove the dash without taking it out of the car to replace the heater core. It takes me about 1 ½ hours to do this. Usually you can get to the heater core by reaching over the dash as it is away from the body. You will need to loosen up the plenum box to get it away from the fire wall by about 4 inches. I think Ford charges 8 hours. After you have done a few of them, its not to bad. It's no picnic either.

  5. #5
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    Dash bracket (to the left in picture)and electrical connections (heater box and electrical box removed).
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6

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    Nice Digger!

    Anyone have a link on how to a how to on this or any Heat/AC procedure on the 98-02 body style? That would be great lol...

  7. #7
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    Since 1990 - present are all based on the Panther chassis I'd venture to say that they are pretty close on removal procedures. I'm sure there are a few differences but for the most part will all be close to the same.

  8. #8
    Junior Member Limo Padawan
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    I just want to say that the day this question was posted we had just dropped off our Limo at the garage for this very problem. They were going to research replacing heater core. I called and aske them if they minded me bringing over the info provided from Digger. What a great help. They used your info and only bikled me at the 4 hours for Labor. What a great help and big savings! Thanks for the info!!!

  9. #9
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    Fantastic !! I'm glad that I could help, that was all I wanted to do by posting this info.

    Thanks for making my time, info and pics worth putting into this post.

  10. #10
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    I think that you provide some very good information and instruction Digger.

    You are like a more informative Haynes manual that people don't have to pay for!

    Good job.

    Now, if anyone can help me with my 2002 Chevy Trailblazer and getting poor fuel mileage when the air temperature is cold.......

  11. #11

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    You rock Digger – my best is about 9 hours.


    Chilton’s step one:

    Remove dash panel – place on bench…
    Matt Harrison
    908-296-3951
    Limousine
    Industry Consultant

    http://goodwillguy.wordpress.com/

  12. #12
    Senior Member Salicete's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Matt Harrison:
    You rock Digger – my best is about 9 hours.


    Chilton’s step one:

    Remove dash panel – place on bench…
    Digger does indeed have some great info and automotive skills; however, my first steps would have been...

    "Remove credit card, pay mechanic."

    A man just has to know his limitations.

  13. #13
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    Maybe someday I'll be that way, but I hope not. I've always liked mechanical challenges, doing things myself that I could just pay someone else to do. I was a mechanical engineer for 20 years before converting to the limo business.

    Back in my kart-racing days I built my reputation more on the internet than the track by posting DIY karting tips on my website. I've learned to always take a multitude of pics during any project in hopes that it will help someone else's job easier.

    Honestly though, doing small mechanical operations such as this isn't really hard, you just need to research all info available, study it and have the proper tools. I'll be the first to admit that when it comes to internal engine problems I'll normally take it to my engine guy. I understand it all but that's too much money for me to play with if I get something wrong in there. I have tried body and paint and discovered that that is also better left to the professionals. Other than that I'll always tackle a job myself. Trans swaps, electrical problems, suspension issues, brakes/lines, A/C, etc., I'll figure it all out eventually.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Salicete's Avatar
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    Seriously, I wish I had your skills. Some of my skills include:

    Stripping Bolts
    Over-Torque Bolts To Point Of Failure
    Rounding Off Bolts
    Loosing Bolts
    Selecting The Wrong Bolts
    Dropping Bolts Into Intricate-Critical Engine Parts
    Shorting Out Electrical Systems...By Dropping In Bolts
    Damaging The Finish, With Hard metal Bolts….


    Well, you get the picture, and we haven't even mentioned the screws yet.

  15. #15
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    Sounds like yer "screwed". HA !!

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