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Thread: Dr Limo says Fuel Miser saves him 12% on gas

  1. #1

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    Dr Limo says Fuel Miser saves him 12% on gas on his own fleet in the newest LCT magazine. It also says the company offers a money back guarantee if you do not see a increase of 10%.

    Has anybody else here used it? If it really saved 10% it would be well worth it.
    I offer Search engine optimization for Limo Companies. Our main limo website has had over 9.6 million hits. Some of my clients: www.FirstClassLimos.net Rome Tours Tours in Rome Limo Service Philadelphia www.PartyBusToledo.com

    Call us at 1-888-51-LIMOS (54667) For referral work in Cleveland Ohio, Columbus, Toledo, & Pittsburgh PA and all cities in between - over 15,000+ customers and counting!

  2. #2
    Super Moderator gunny's Avatar
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    Here's the FTC's take on gas saving devices
    Consumer Beware
    Airport Limo Service Spring Hill, Brooksville, Citrus County FL
    http://gunnysairportlimo.com/tampa_a...ce_spring_hill

  3. #3
    Member Limo Padawan
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    One gas saving device that works (only on 4x4's) is warn manual locking hubs.

    They disengage the front drivetrain so you're not wastefully spinning the front axles when you only need 2wd.

    They got me about 2mpg on my QX56 stretch, so they pay for themselves within months. They also save money on wear and tear - no more busted front CV boots!

    They make them for escalades, navigators, and pretty much any 4x4.

    They look like this:

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    "I'll come through in something cleaner than you with new plates"

  4. #4
    Member Limo Padawan
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    but realistically, there isn't anything you can just slap on your engine to save gas mileage. The one that bothers me most is the "Tornado". So many people probably fall for that scam.
    -------------------------------------
    "I'll come through in something cleaner than you with new plates"

  5. #5

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    I looked into this and was told to avoid this catagory of products. My source is in Washington, D.C.
    Dean Schuler

  6. #6
    Member Limo Padawan
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    I laughed when I first heard about this gizmo...I couldn't figure how magnetism could have anything to do with fuel efficiency. However, I have to admit it does work. I was given one when I attended an association meeting in New Jersey and was just going to give it away. But then I decided to try it and when it didn't work, bust the chops of the guy selling them. Well, that idea went to hell...

    I drove my Mitsubishi from North Alabama to the Florida panhandle. On the way down, my car got 36.2 Avg MPG (according to the computer in the car)I then installed this thing on my fuel line as in the directions and when I drove back home, the computer said I was getting 39.8 Avg MPG. I have no idea how or why it works, but it has made a difference.

    I also know that Jeff Greene installed these things on his fleet and says they work and there are other companies who also say the same. I have never tried one on a larger vehicle and maybe the increase has something to do with the magnets not only affecting the metal fuel line, but also the injection system itself...but that is only a guess.

    On a side note, it has been on my car for about a year and a half and the car still runs perfect...so it hasn't harmed my vehicle.

  7. #7

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    Explaining how it works would be a service the industry could appreciate.
    Originally posted by SOUTHERNYANKEE:
    I laughed when I first heard about this gizmo...I couldn't figure how magnetism could have anything to do with fuel efficiency. However, I have to admit it does work. I was given one when I attended an association meeting in New Jersey and was just going to give it away. But then I decided to try it and when it didn't work, bust the chops of the guy selling them. Well, that idea went to hell...

    I drove my Mitsubishi from North Alabama to the Florida panhandle. On the way down, my car got 36.2 Avg MPG (according to the computer in the car)I then installed this thing on my fuel line as in the directions and when I drove back home, the computer said I was getting 39.8 Avg MPG. I have no idea how or why it works, but it has made a difference.

    I also know that Jeff Greene installed these things on his fleet and says they work and there are other companies who also say the same. I have never tried one on a larger vehicle and maybe the increase has something to do with the magnets not only affecting the metal fuel line, but also the injection system itself...but that is only a guess.

    On a side note, it has been on my car for about a year and a half and the car still runs perfect...so it hasn't harmed my vehicle.
    Dean Schuler

  8. #8
    Member Limo Padawan
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    I wish I could Dean, but chemistry and physics are definately not my forte'.

    By the way...have you finished bracing for Hurricane Dean? Hopefully it will blow itself out before it gets near the Gulf Coast.

    Good Luck!!!

  9. #9

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    Then the answer is adios to this product...
    Originally posted by SOUTHERNYANKEE:
    I wish I could Dean, but chemistry and physics are definately not my forte'.

    By the way...have you finished bracing for Hurricane Dean? Hopefully it will blow itself out before it gets near the Gulf Coast.

    Good Luck!!!
    Dean Schuler

  10. #10
    Member Limo Padawan
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    Originally posted by Dean Schuler:
    Then the answer is adios to this product...

    I did a quick search on this just for fun.

    Here's from the advertisers website:

    Generally a liquid or gas fuel used for an internal combustion engine is composed of a set of molecules. Each molecule includes a number of atoms, which is composed of a nucleus and electrons orbiting around their nucleus. The molecules have magnetic moments in themselves, and the rotating electrons cause magnetic phenomena. Thus, positive (+) and negative (-) electric charges exists in the fuel's molecules. For this reason, the fuel particles of the negative and positive electric charges are not split into more minute particles. Accordingly, the fuels are not actively interlocked with oxygen during combustion, thereby causing incomplete combustion. To improve the above, the fuels have been required to be decomposed and ionized. The ionization of the fuel particles is accomplished by the supply of magnetic force from a magnet.

    The resultant conditioned fuel / air mixture magnetized burns more completely, producing higher engine output, better fuel economy, more power and most importantly reduces the amount of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen in the exhaust. Another benefits if these devices is that magnetically charged fuel molecules with opposite polarities dissolve carbon build-up in carburetor jets, fuel injectors, and combustion chambers help to clean up the engine and maintain the clean condition.

    and heres from the FTC.gov website:

    FTC Seeks to Shut Down Bogus “Automotive Fuel Saver” Operation

    The Federal Trade Commission has asked a U.S. district court judge to shut down an operation that used illegal spam to make deceptive claims about an “automotive fuel saver” that doesn’t save fuel. The FTC charges that the spam violates the CAN-SPAM Act and the deceptive claims violate the FTC Act. The agency will ask the court to permanently bar the law violations and order the defendants to provide redress for consumers.

    An FTC complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Chicago alleges that Anthony Renda and International Research and Development Corporation manufacture and market a “magnetic device” under the names FuelMAX and Super FuelMAX. They claim that when the device is attached to an automobile’s fuel line, it will fracture gasoline hydrocarbon chains through magnetic resonance and:

    * Increase mileage by up to 27%;
    * Reduce Fuel Consumption;
    * Reduce Emissions;
    * Provide Accelerated Combustion; and
    * Burn Fuel That is Normally Exhausted as Un-burned Pollution.

    In November 2001, the FTC issued a warning that these product claims and advertising were false, lacked substantiation, and likely violated the FTC Act.

    Other defendants, acting as Super FuelMAX resellers, set up Web sites, including www.fuelsaverpro.com to sell the magnetic devices under the pseudonym Fuel Saver Pro. The Web sites made claims such as:

    * Increase gas mileage 27%+ by helping fuel burn better;
    * Reduce emissions by 43%;
    * Smoother engine;
    * pays for itself FAST!!!!
    * Gives an extra 10% more horsepower; and
    * Based on the size of your gas tank you will save from $8 for a typical 15 gallon gas tank, but larger V8 SUVs and trucks will save up to $20 per tank.

    The defendant resellers used spam that made deceptive claims to drive traffic to their
    Web sites. According to the FTC, the spam contained the names of innocent third parties in the “from” or “reply to” fields – a practice known as spoofing – and did not contain a valid physical postal address.

    The FTC alleges that the magnetic “fuel saver” doesn’t save fuel, doesn’t increase gas mileage, and doesn’t reduce emissions. According to the complaint, the claims are false and misleading and violate the FTC Act. The agency also alleges that by providing promotional materials with the false claims to distributors, resellers, and affiliates, the defendants have provided them with the means and instrumentalities to violate the FTC Act. The agency also alleges that the spoofing and failure to provide a valid physical postal address violate the CAN-SPAM Act.

    The FTC charges that consumers throughout the country have suffered substantial monetary loss and the defendants have been unjustly enriched. It has asked the court to halt the deceptive claims, bar future violations of the CAN-SPAM Act, and order redress for consumers.

    The FTC’s complaint names International Research and Development Corporation of Nevada; Anthony Renda; Net Marketing Group, LLC; Micro System Technologies; Floyd J. Tassin, Jr; Marcia Tassin; Diverse Marketing Group, Inc.; Diverse Marketing Group, LLC; Mark C. Ayoub; and Epro2000, Inc. as defendants.
    hahah
    -------------------------------------
    "I'll come through in something cleaner than you with new plates"

  11. #11

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    The members of this site are not sheep easily impressed by any personal endorsements. If you want to push that product here we want the full explanation.
    Dean Schuler

  12. #12
    Member Limo Padawan
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    As I have said...All I know about this is what I have seen myself. I am not telling people to go out and purchase the product and I'm not saying that it is a "miracle product." Someone asked a question and I answered it with my own experience. If it had not worked me, then I would have said so.

    If people want to try it, then try it...if not, then I really don't care. An opinion was asked and I gave mine. That's not an endorsement, it's just an opinion from one person's experience.

  13. #13

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    We expect more from you sir !!
    Originally posted by SOUTHERNYANKEE:
    As I have said...All I know about this is what I have seen myself. I am not telling people to go out and purchase the product and I'm not saying that it is a "miracle product." Someone asked a question and I answered it with my own experience. If it had not worked me, then I would have said so.

    If people want to try it, then try it...if not, then I really don't care. An opinion was asked and I gave mine. That's not an endorsement, it's just an opinion from one person's experience.
    Dean Schuler

  14. #14

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    I'm one that is leary about adding anything to my fuel except Seafoam. I have a few friends that driver OTR and came across a product called CA-40. The website is www.ca40g.com

    I was really skeptical, but in my own minivan I increased by 4.5 mpg on the first tankfull. The OTR drivers are seeing a 10% increase on mileage!! That's money in the pocket at the end of the month.

    I'm not saying to run out and buy this stuff, but at least check it out with an open mind.

    Only 2 oz. per 50 gal of fuel. Lasts long!!

    Check out the website and decide if it's right for you.

    (I'm not affiliated with the company or any type of sales. I found it at the local auto parts store. They can't keep it on the shelves.)

  15. #15

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    See thats what I'm talking about. Why would Dr. Limo and SOUTHERNYANKEE now say it works for both of them? Has anybody tried this and not had it NOT work for them? I'm almost starting to believe it works.
    I offer Search engine optimization for Limo Companies. Our main limo website has had over 9.6 million hits. Some of my clients: www.FirstClassLimos.net Rome Tours Tours in Rome Limo Service Philadelphia www.PartyBusToledo.com

    Call us at 1-888-51-LIMOS (54667) For referral work in Cleveland Ohio, Columbus, Toledo, & Pittsburgh PA and all cities in between - over 15,000+ customers and counting!

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