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Thread: GCLA Meeting with Ford Commercial Reps

  1. #1
    Super Moderator Limo Scene's Avatar
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    I apologize this is a little late but has valuable information.


    The GCLA recently was honored to have J. Chris Eldridge, Commercial Area Field Manager for Ford-Lincoln commercial vehicle operations
    attend it's monthly meeting. Eldridge provided information about Ford-Lincoln products, plans and programs along with Bill Howard, National Accounts Manager who also attended.

    Eldridge related that contrary to popular belief, the Excursions will remain in production at least through 2005 primarily because of the demand for the vehicle from the limousine industry.

    Eldridge also encouraged operators to use their local Ford dealership for service work. While many operators cite the high cost of dealership servicing, Eldridge advised that the company had become sensitive to the perception that their services were too high and have become much more price competitive in the recent past. This includes the creation of the Business Preferred Network which expedites to process of getting commercial vehicles in and out on an expedited basis while providing competitive pricing on such things as oil changes and brake jobs.

    Some interesting facts were presented about using after-market products such as brake pads and improper use of oil. While most people have used either 10w-30 or 10w-40 grade oil, Ford recommends only 5w-20 in their engines and failure to do so can cause your warranty to become voided on engine components. It seems that most quick-lube type oil changing businesses use 10w-40 and don't use the 5w-20 because of the higher cost. In case you didn't know, the idling of a vehicle for one hour is the equivalent of placing thirty-three miles of driving on the engine and we all know that our vehicle do a lot of idling.

    For those of you using diesel powered engines on Excursions or other vehicle, make sure you change your oil and fuel filters regularly to maintain the best mileage rates and engine performance.

    Eldridge also discussed how after market brake pads were much cheaper than buying from your Ford dealership but you will never get the same smooth braking as you do using OEM replacement pads. Many operators who use after-market brake pads complain of squeaking and squealing brakes which is a direct result of the inferior brake pad which Ford acknowledges is cheaper than theirs and will probably last longer than theirs but the soft material of theirs is what provides the smooth braking in Towncars.

    Speaking of Towncars, the next major body change will take place in the 2009 models. That means cars purchased today will continue to look "new" for at least the next several years.

    In other news, California Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi has agreed to take a closer look at the classification of chauffeurs for Workers Compensation policies. Currently chauffeurs are grouped with charter bus drivers and the industry has grown to a point that it needs and deserves a risk category which is independent. The GCLA has hired a lobbyist who addressed this issue among others with state legislation and promises regular government updates at monthly meetings.
    Jim A. Luff
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    Limousine Scene - An Award Winning Company Since 1990
    Bakersfield, CA
    Limousines, Sedans, Vans, Charter Buses, Limo-Buses, Wheelchair Vans www.limousinescene.com

  2. #2
    Senior Member Wade Randolph's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Limo Scene:
    I apologize this is a little late but has valuable information.


    The GCLA recently was honored to have J. Chris Eldridge, Commercial Area Field Manager for Ford-Lincoln commercial vehicle operations
    attend it's monthly meeting. Eldridge provided information about Ford-Lincoln products, plans and programs along with Bill Howard, National Accounts Manager who also attended.

    Eldridge related that contrary to popular belief, the Excursions will remain in production at least through 2005 primarily because of the demand for the vehicle from the limousine industry.

    Eldridge also encouraged operators to use their local Ford dealership for service work. While many operators cite the high cost of dealership servicing, Eldridge advised that the company had become sensitive to the perception that their services were too high and have become much more price competitive in the recent past. This includes the creation of the Business Preferred Network which expedites to process of getting commercial vehicles in and out on an expedited basis while providing competitive pricing on such things as oil changes and brake jobs.

    Some interesting facts were presented about using after-market products such as brake pads and improper use of oil. While most people have used either 10w-30 or 10w-40 grade oil, Ford recommends only 5w-20 in their engines and failure to do so can cause your warranty to become voided on engine components. It seems that most quick-lube type oil changing businesses use 10w-40 and don't use the 5w-20 because of the higher cost. In case you didn't know, the idling of a vehicle for one hour is the equivalent of placing thirty-three miles of driving on the engine and we all know that our vehicle do a lot of idling.

    For those of you using diesel powered engines on Excursions or other vehicle, make sure you change your oil and fuel filters regularly to maintain the best mileage rates and engine performance.

    Eldridge also discussed how after market brake pads were much cheaper than buying from your Ford dealership but you will never get the same smooth braking as you do using OEM replacement pads. Many operators who use after-market brake pads complain of squeaking and squealing brakes which is a direct result of the inferior brake pad which Ford acknowledges is cheaper than theirs and will probably last longer than theirs but the soft material of theirs is what provides the smooth braking in Towncars.

    Speaking of Towncars, the next major body change will take place in the 2009 models. That means cars purchased today will continue to look "new" for at least the next several years.

    In other news, California Insurance Commissioner John Garamendi has agreed to take a closer look at the classification of chauffeurs for Workers Compensation policies. Currently chauffeurs are grouped with charter bus drivers and the industry has grown to a point that it needs and deserves a risk category which is independent. The GCLA has hired a lobbyist who addressed this issue among others with state legislation and promises regular government updates at monthly meetings. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Jim thanks for the update. Im glad to hear about the body style change is not too soon.

  3. #3
    Senior Member SANTOS's Avatar
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    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Speaking of Towncars, the next major body change will take place in the 2009 models. That means cars purchased today will continue to look "new" for at least the next several years.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I find this statement very hard to believe. I have asked this question to various coachbuilders and Lincoln Dealers and have had so many different answers. Some say Spring 2006 others say 2007 and yet others tell me 2008. I did a side by side Town Car model change comparison and came up with the following results:

    1990- Complete redesign which lasted 5 model years (1990 thru 1994)
    1995- Small interior and exterior modifications that lasted 3 model years. Mods included redesigned headlights, bumpers and taillights. (1995 thru 1997)

    1998- Complete redesign which lasted 5 model years (1998 thru 2002)
    2003- Small interior and exterior modifications which should last 3 model years. Mods include redesigned headlights, bumpers and taillights. (2003 thru 2005)

    If my calculations are correct you can see that so far Ford is following the same model change schedule as it did in the 1990's so we should see a complete redesign of the Town Car starting with the 2006 model year. I assume that if this schedule holds true, then they will unveil the new model to the coachbuilders come late summer/early autumn 2005 and we should see the first limos most likely at the 2006 LCT Vegas show.
    Rich Costeira
    Owner
    Santos VIP, LLC
    www.santoslimousine.com

  4. #4

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    2009 would be a dream. I have heard 2006 or 2007.
    Dean Schuler

  5. #5

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    Ford's strategy changes with the input from the customers.

    If you look at the Crown Vic it followed similar redesign patters:

    1992 major redesign to an aero vic
    1993/4 slight exterior touch ups
    1995/7 exterior redesign
    1998/present same basic bubble vic design with minor components changing... 2003 complete suspension redesign but still the exact same body due to expire in 2006

    thats like Mercedes-BMW type of design tactics, the longer the better.

    --Russ

    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by HARPO:
    <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Speaking of Towncars, the next major body change will take place in the 2009 models. That means cars purchased today will continue to look "new" for at least the next several years.
    <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    I find this statement very hard to believe. I have asked this question to various coachbuilders and Lincoln Dealers and have had so many different answers. Some say Spring 2006 others say 2007 and yet others tell me 2008. I did a side by side Town Car model change comparison and came up with the following results:

    1990- Complete redesign which lasted 5 model years (1990 thru 1994)
    1995- Small interior and exterior modifications that lasted 3 model years. Mods included redesigned headlights, bumpers and taillights. (1995 thru 1997)

    1998- Complete redesign which lasted 5 model years (1998 thru 2002)
    2003- Small interior and exterior modifications which should last 3 model years. Mods include redesigned headlights, bumpers and taillights. (2003 thru 2005)

    If my calculations are correct you can see that so far Ford is following the same model change schedule as it did in the 1990's so we should see a complete redesign of the Town Car starting with the 2006 model year. I assume that if this schedule holds true, then they will unveil the new model to the coachbuilders come late summer/early autumn 2005 and we should see the first limos most likely at the 2006 LCT Vegas show. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

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