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Thread: bondo lifting/rust repair

  1. #1

    Default bondo lifting/rust repair

    Has anyone had any success repairing bondo lifting or bondo bubbling? It is just above the trim. Trim is glued, not bolted.

    Everything I have read suggests it is surface rust caused by water being trapped behind the trim and getting under the paint by means of hairline cracks in the paint.

    But all the body shops I talk to tell me there is no such thing as surface rust, if is under the paint it is coming from the backside and is impossible to fix permanently.The backside is primed and insulated, and it only happens where water pools by the trim, if it's moisture from the backside, why not anywhere else?

    And has anyone used fiberglass instead of bondo.

    So I'm wondering, are these guys correct, or are they just not willing to work on a limo? Get lots of comments about how it will tie up too much shopspace.

    Thanks in advance, Kevin

  2. #2

    Default

    I just don't think they want the job. I had an issue with an older stretched limo from Tiffany (2002 130" stretched Cadillac Deville). The 130" body panel was lifting just below the body molding. The body shop took the molding off, went in, cleaned up the old body work as best they could, smoothed everything out with body filler, prepped the entire panel, painted it, and replaced the molding. Looked as good as new. No body wave / ripples at all. It was done in a weekend and I was very impressed with the work. That was two years ago and the work still looks good. Total cost was $600 cash.

    I did take the limo back to my garage between the primer stage and the paint stage so that it didn't tie up space in their garage while the body work cured before the final repaint.

    Several other shops turned the job down up front. One other shop gave me a quote at double what I paid.
    Andrew Armitage
    Vintage Chauffeuring LLC
    Andrew@VintageChauffeuring.com
    www.VintageChauffeuring.com

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vintage Limos View Post
    I just don't think they want the job. I had an issue with an older stretched limo from Tiffany (2002 130" stretched Cadillac Deville). The 130" body panel was lifting just below the body molding. The body shop took the molding off, went in, cleaned up the old body work as best they could, smoothed everything out with body filler, prepped the entire panel, painted it, and replaced the molding. Looked as good as new. No body wave / ripples at all. It was done in a weekend and I was very impressed with the work. That was two years ago and the work still looks good. Total cost was $600 cash.

    I did take the limo back to my garage between the primer stage and the paint stage so that it didn't tie up space in their garage while the body work cured before the final repaint.

    Several other shops turned the job down up front. One other shop gave me a quote at double what I paid.
    Thanks Vintage,
    I just don't understand how a fairly minor rust problem can be no different than major cancer but that's what I'm hearing. It's a 2008, not that old. I see old cars at cruise night all the time that were hauled out of the weeds, some with before and after pictures and they look fine. But the don't want to work on it thing is probably right.

  4. #4
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    Default

    What the body shop is telling you is correct. Surface rust only occurs on unpainted metal and can almost be removed with a brush.

    Rust blisters occurring on painted metal is the type of rust that must be cut out as there is no cure.

    Jim Luff owns a body shop and can probably confirm this diagnosis.

  5. #5

    Default

    My paper mache stretched section has a new bubble of love every time I look . It's funny I used to fix up and sell cars and the MAACO mud jobs we always had a joke about hope it doesn't rain and don't wash that thing and sure enough by the next days morning dew there were bubbles lol! Also had my Jaguar rear quarter cancer fixed with fiberglass and even that started coming back right away from the inside. It comes down to shoddy work the first time and yes it will keep coming back if not fixed right. The old cars you mention are ground down to bare metal and the complete body inside and out gets primed first.

  6. #6

    Default

    Here's a pretty good video on YouTube about what's really under the paint and how trying to repair a few bubbles turns into a fairly big project.

    http://youtu.be/qUehclZVeIs
    Andrew Armitage
    Vintage Chauffeuring LLC
    Andrew@VintageChauffeuring.com
    www.VintageChauffeuring.com

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